New Comet!- Comet C/2017 O1

 

Comet C/2017 O1

A new comet has been discovered on images captured on July 19th by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae.  The comet designated C/2017 O1 by the MPC, will grace our skies this fall.  It was magnitude 15.3 at discovery, relatively bright for a newly discovered comet.  Its brightness at discovery is probably the result of it emerging from the glare of the Sun, where the large survey telescopes dare not point for fear of damage to their equipment. It will be a  northern hemisphere object into this fall.  Some predictions have it brightening to 7th magnitude, but it is really too early to tell how bright it will become.

 

Transit Dreams Observatory imaged the comet on the morning of July 26th before morning twilight.  Uncalibrated measurements with Astrometrica put the comet at magnitude 14.4-14.9

COD W33
CON Transit Dreams Observatory
OBS D. Wilde
MEA D. Wilde
TEL 127mm F7.5 APO Refractor + CCD
ACK MPCReport file updated 2017.07.26 06:51:22
NET UCAC-4
CK17O010 KC2017 07 26.36131 02 44 18.00 -08 12 57.4 14.4 N W33
CK17O010 KC2017 07 26.37129 02 44 18.91 -08 12 44.6 14.5 N W33
CK17O010 KC2017 07 26.37880 02 44 19.70 -08 12 35.8 14.5 N W33
CK17O010 KC2017 07 26.38783 02 44 20.53 -08 12 24.6 14.4 N W33
CK17O010 C2017 07 26.35808 02 44 17.70 -08 13 01.0 14.6 N W33
CK17O010 C2017 07 26.38664 02 44 20.43 -08 12 26.3 14.9 N W33

—– end —–

 

TDO Reaches 50 Asteroids

Sometimes the weather and the Moon don’t cooperate in our quest to measure faint NEO’s and provide useful data that can refine their orbits.  Located in Southeastern United States, Transit Dream Observatory is subject to high humidity and often cloudy skies during the summer months. Even though TDO is in a rural area, the sky glow from water vapor in the air reduces how deep we can go.  On those nights if conditions are good enough to image I’ll still attempt to capture some brighter asteroids, to perfect my methods and reliability in imaging and measuring.

Last night was one of those nights, with the moon being almost full.  A list of 12 brighter asteroids was compiled to image.  In most cases asteroids like these have well established orbits that need little or no refinement.  Some technical difficulties with the equipment, and some user error in programming the software to automate the imaging did not allow me to get as far as I would have wanted.  I use Ccd Commander to program the operation of the observatory and integrate the image list into the imaging paramters.  A simple mistake in entering the start time in 12hr notation, instead of 24 hr. would have started the imaging operation  at 10:15 a.m. had I not caught the error.  This still caused a delay which prevented capturing some of the asteroids that were sinking in the west.

The weather also interrupted and ended the session early as clouds filled the sky.  In all 4 asteroids were imaged and measured.

(00006) Hebe, (00030) Urania, (00387) Aquitania, and (00599) Luisa

This brings the total to 50 asteroids measured, with 199 measurements.

COD W33
CON Transit Dreams Oservatory, Campobello, SC 29322 [dwilde.tdo@gmail.com]
OBS D. Wilde
MEA D. Wilde
TEL 127mm F7.5 APO Refractor + CCD
ACK MPCReport file updated 2017.07.08 01:02:51
AC2 dwilde.tdo@gmail.com
NET UCAC-4
00006 C2017 07 08.19267 17 24 19.63 -05 23 10.6 8.7 R W33
00006 C2017 07 08.20010 17 24 19.17 -05 23 13.5 9.3 R W33
00030 C2017 07 08.12781 14 20 09.85 -16 35 46.6 11.8 R W33
00030 C2017 07 08.13527 14 20 09.98 -16 35 46.7 11.8 R W33
00030 C2017 07 08.14271 14 20 10.10 -16 35 46.8 11.8 R W33
00387 C2017 07 08.11031 13 24 49.46 +12 37 00.6 11.8 R W33
00387 C2017 07 08.11777 13 24 49.83 +12 36 54.9 11.8 R W33
00387 C2017 07 08.12522 13 24 50.18 +12 36 49.4 11.8 R W33
00599 C2017 07 08.16720 14 58 40.31 -27 49 58.2 12.5 R W33
00599 C2017 07 08.17462 14 58 40.23 -27 49 58.9 12.4 R W33
—– end —–

Asteroid (0070) Panopaea

Asteroid (0070) Panopaea is a main belt asteroid.  It is approximately 22 kilometers long by 2 kilometers wide.  Discovered in 1861, it orbits the sun in 4.23 years and rotates in 15.87 hours.  It was imaged and measured at Transit Dreams Observatory on June 12, 2017.

 

COD W33
CON Transit Dreams Observatory
OBS D. Wilde
MEA D. Wilde
TEL 127mm F7.5 APO Refractor + CCD
ACK MPCReport file updated 2017.06.12 12:03:11
NET UCAC-4
00070 C2017 06 12.08756 11 42 03.10 +09 33 41.5 12.8 R W33
00070 C2017 06 12.10662 11 42 03.75 +09 33 31.4 12.7 R W33
00070 C2017 06 12.12675 11 42 04.43 +09 33 20.9 12.6 R W33
00070 C2017 06 12.14693 11 42 05.13 +09 33 10.0 12.7 R W33
—– end —–

 

New Menu

New menu items have been established for the website.  The data menu item is supporting sub-menus for the Asteroid data and Comet data measurements recorded and reported to the IAU Minor Planet Center.  The measurements with the “xxx” suffix were made before the establishment of Transit Dreams Observatory as MPC W33.

 

 

Horsehead Nebula- IC434

IC 434

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Horsehead Nebula (IC434) is located in a the constellation of Orion at the end of Orion’s Belt, near the bright star Alnitak. It is 1300 light years from Earth. The ionized cloud of hydrogen is illuminated from the hot young stars within this stellar nursery allow us to see this dark cloud. The Horsehead gets its name from the part of the cloud shaped like a horses head. This image only covers a portion of the entire nebula.

Explore Scientific ES127ED @f7.5,
Paramount MX+
Atik One ccd
(20) x 300 seconds, 7nm Ha filter.
Photoshop CS5, Carboni’s tools for the false color

 

 

 

Asteroid (111253) 2001 XU10

(111253) 2001 XU10 2017-06-11

Asteroid (111253) 2001 XU10 is an Apollo class asteroid, name for the first asteroid discovered in this class (01862) Apollo.  This class of asteroids are Eartth crossers which means thay can pass very close to Earth which can create the threat of collision.  It was tracked and measured at TDO on June 11,2017.

COD W33
CON Transit Dreams Observatory
OBS D. Wilde
MEA D. Wilde
TEL 127mm F7.5 APO Refractor + CCD
ACK MPCReport file updated 2017.06.11 11:56:10
NET UCAC-4
B1253 KC2017 06 11.33677 01 10 21.75 +17 48 06.0 16.6 R W33
B1253 KC2017 06 11.34819 01 10 23.50 +17 48 50.8 18.5 R W33
—– end —–

 

 

Asteroid (136108) Haumea

(136108) Haumea 2017-05-16

Asteroid (136108) Haumea was imaged and measured at TDO on May 16,2017.  (136108) Haumea is a dwarf planet, in the plutoid class, discovered in 2004 at Palomar Observatory.  Two small moons were found to be orbiting Haumea in 2005 in images taken at the Keck Observatory. Haumaea is named after the Hawaiian goddess of childbirth. 

COD W33
CON Transit Dreams Observatory
OBS D. Wilde
MEA D. Wilde
TEL 127mm F7.5 APO Refractor + CCD
ACK MPCReport file updated 2017.05.17 13:50:34
NET UCAC-4
D6108 KC2017 05 17.08046 14 07 07.34 +17 29 52.5 17.0 N W33
D6108 KC2017 05 17.08937 14 07 07.30 +17 29 51.9 16.8 N W33
D6108 KC2017 05 17.09826 14 07 07.26 +17 29 52.6 17.0 N W33
D6108 KC2017 05 17.10716 14 07 07.23 +17 29 52.4 17.0 N W33
—– end —–

Asteroid (7194) Susanrose

2017-05-16 (3)

Here is an image of one of the asteroids I measured while conducting my asteroid astrometry program on May 15th. The images used to derive the measurements, shown at the lower right in the photo, consisted of 40 images, 30 seconds each with the ccd binned at 3×3 to increase sensitivity. The images were captured in 4 groups of 10 with 8 minutes separating the groups. The groups were stacked in Astrometrica software which also did the measuring. Stacking the image groups was necessary to create enough signal for an accurate measurement. It was measured at magnitude 16.5. It is currently cruising through the constellation of Serpens Caput.

What’s significant about this asteroid is its name. It is named for the President of my club in NY, Sue Rose, for her decades of support to the astronomical community. Sue was surprised with the announcement, and presentation of a beautiful plaque at the 2009 ALCon convention hosted by the Amateur Observers’ Society at Hofstra University.

COD W33
CON Transit Dreams Observatory
OBS D. Wilde
MEA D. Wilde
TEL 127mm F7.5 APO Refractor + CCD
ACK MPCReport file updated 2017.05.16 11:31:28
NET UCAC-4
07194 KC2017 05 16.10882 15 49 00.31 -01 33 07.9 16.4 R W33
07194 KC2017 05 16.11851 15 48 59.78 -01 33 03.0 16.4 R W33
07194 KC2017 05 16.12817 15 48 59.25 -01 32 58.8 16.5 R W33
07194 KC2017 05 16.13787 15 48 58.74 -01 32 54.2 16.8 R W33
—– end —–

M42- First Light image inside Transit Dreams Observatory

M 42- First Light inside Transit Dreams Observatory

This image of the Great Orion Nebula was captured as a test of the pointing and tracking of the MX+ mount.  It’s a combined total of 15.5 minutes exposure in LRGB.

ES127 F7.5 APO refractor- 952mm f.l.

Atik One 6.0 ccd

Astronomik LRGB filters

(1ea)-2sec to 4 min subs of Luminance, 11 minutes total.

(3) 30 sec each RGB, 4.5 minutes total.

 

 

 

Transit Dreams Observatory awarded code W33 from the Minor Planet Center

This announcement is late, but I wanted to share it with our friends here who don’t follow us on Facebook.

I am proud to announce the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center has designated Transit Dreams Observatory as Minor Planet Center W33. This designation was earned by T.D.O. as a result of our submission to the MPC of precise reliable astrometric measurements of asteroid positions in our solar system. These measurements provide the professional and advanced amateur astronomers the data needed to help refine orbits and gain additional knowledge about our solar system neighbors. Observatory codes are not given out lightly, and the Transit Dreams Observatory will endeavor to continue contributing accurate data to this body of work.

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